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2015

Andifli Mahallesi, Hastane

Cad. No:3, 07580 Kaş/Antalya

+90 532 400 8836

SINGLE BREATH NO TANK

HOW DEEP CAN YOU GO?

EXPLORE IT

 

Not reliant on modern equipment, freediving is a unique reflection of the human desire to both compete with and be one with the elements. Freediving requires very little equipment, or if you prefer none at all. One of its biggest advantages is that, unlike in SCUBA there is no depth limit, just your discipline and personal ability. In the end its all about union with nature and relaxation within yourself.

 

 

So why Freediving?

Freediving and Human Anatomy

 

Imagine..... mind and body relaxed you let yourself go and slip into the water. Just like the dolphins and the whales you become a part of the magnificent harmony of nature.

 

Freediving apnea is simply holding your breath and diving down to discover your freedom.
 

To really understand freediving we need to look back through human history, to humanity’s connection with nature and to the genetic specializations within the human body which have evolved to equip us to do it.
 

People have been exploring the underwater world for as much as 16,000 years. Historically freediving was a hunting technique on which many peoples livelihood and wellbeing depended. These day freediving is still often associated with spearfishing, but in fact for the last 70 years its history it has become a sport in which people aim to realize themselves and their potentials...

 

What is Freediving?

Competitive Freediving Categories

Static apnea:

 

Static apnea is a discipline in which a person holds their breath (apnea) underwater for as long as possible, and need not swim any distance.Is timed breath holding disiplin usually attempted in a pool.

Dynamic apnea:

 

Dynamic apnea covers two of the eight competitive freediving categories dynamic withoutfins and dynamic with fins. Both disciplines require breath held dives where the diver travels in a horizontal position under water under their own power without aid/physical contact of a static surface, with the exception of the pool wall when done indoors. The records can only be recognized in pools of 25m or greater.

When diving in the dynamic without fins category, divers will usually prefer the shorter 25m pools, so they can take advantage of the wall-kick. However, when diving in the dynamic with fins category, divers will usually prefer the longer 50m pools, so the wall-turn will not slow them down.

 

                         

Constant weight apnea:

Constant weight (CWT) is a freediving discipline which the freediver descends and ascends using his fins/monofin and/or with the use of his arms without pulling on the rope or changing his ballast; only a single hold of the rope to stop the descent and start the ascent is allowed. Constant weight is the common sportive depth discipline of freediving, because of the specific fins or monofins used in it. Constant weight is one of the three disciplines considered for international competition, with static apnea and dynamic with fins.

Constant weight apnea without fins:

 

Constant weight (CWT) is a freediving discipline which the freediver descends and ascends using his fins/monofin and/or with the use of his arms without pulling on the rope or changing his ballast; only a single hold of the rope to stop the descent and start the ascent is allowed. Constant weight is the common sportive depth discipline of freediving, because of the specific fins or monofins used in it. Constant weight is one of the three disciplines considered for international competition, with static apnea and dynamic with fins.

Free immersion apnea:

Free immersion apnea is a discipline in which the athlete uses the vertical guiderope to pull him or herself down to depth and back to the surface. It is known for its ease compared with the Constant Weight disciplines, while the athlete is still not allowed to release weights.

The human body is an incredible system, highly refined at self balancing and harmonizing with its environment. Its intrinsic connection with water is demonstrated by its evolved responses. If a newborn baby’s head is submerged its first instinct is to hold its breath. Is it just a survival reflex or evidence of humankind’s deeper relationship with water? It wasn’t until the 1960s that scientists stopped to ask this question. They found the answer in the discovery that humans poses the Mammalian Dive Reflex. MDR

Simply put, MDR describes the effects triggered by immersing your face in water and by the body’s sensing of the increased pressure at depth. These changes are the basis of the human ability to dive deeper for longer and the theory behind freediving is based on your MDR. You can learn more about MDR in the Level 1 and 2 SSI courses

Variable weight apnea:

Variable weight a discipline in which the athlete uses the vertical guide rope to pull him or herself down to depth and back to the surface. It is known for its ease compared with the Constant Weight disciplines, while the athlete is still not allowed to release weights.

No-limits apnea:

No Limit apnea is a record discipline that allows the athlete to use any means of breath-hold diving to depth and return to the surface as long as a guideline is used to measure the distance. Most divers use a weighted sled to dive down and use an inflatable bag to return to the surface.